Man, I have to tell ya, I took for granted the days I worked in Tampa/St Pete and didn't realize at the time how nice it was not to clean snow and ice off my car in the Winter.

Don't get me wrong, I like living in Downtown Lansing, but it can be brutal walking out to my car with the temps as cold as they have been.  I thank goodness for the remote start that I have on my car.

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As much as I love living in Michigan, winters can be pretty rough. Snow and ice and cold weather give us the uncomfortable job of cleaning off our cars.  Also the tasks of shoveling your driveway and putting chains on our car to dig it out of the snow.

Don't Do This To Your Windshield Wipers.

Here is one thing you should skip the next time there's ice and snow on your car according to simplemost.com. It's putting your car's windshield wiper straight up into the air.

Man upset after getting a night parking ticket during the winter
FelixRenaud
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Despite the fact that many people continue to do this, some experts caution against it. . When wipers are standing up in the air, the plastic gears could be weakened or damaged by forceful wind gusts, and the rubber blade can even be blown off.

 

 

Keeps This In Mind This Winter

Here is something else to keep in mind.  The cold weather can make glass more delicate, so heavy winds can knock the windshield wiper back down quickly crack or shatter the windshield. even if it happens gently.

Another idea is to cover the windshield with a blanket, leaving the windshield wipers down.

The University Of Michigan has more winter tips for you here. Stay warm and be safe this winter.

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