As the weather attempts to get warmer and spring settles in, it's also that time of year get out and enjoy Michigan fishing again...but you'll need a new license first.

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Michigan 2021 Fishing Licenses Expire March 31st, 2022

When you buy a Michigan fishing license, if you purchase the "Annual All-Species Resident" option, it is valid from March 1st or from when you bought it until March 31st that following year.

That means if you got one for 2021, it is set to expire within the next 24 hours.

If you wish to purchase one for 2022, if you haven't already or this is your first time, you do have to be at least 17 years old. If you are not, you don't need a license. However, if you are assisting someone under 17, you need to be licensed, per DNR fishing requirements.

When it comes to where you can purchase your license, you can purchase online through the Michigan DNR license and permit website. Otherwise, you can purchase them in-person in stores at an astounding amount of locations ranging from sporting goods stores, Meijer, WalMart, local bait shops, etc. The DNR shares a map of all locations in Michigan to purchase a license in person.

Keep in mind, you don't HAVE to purchase the $26 annual license for Michigan residents. There are daily options, senior rates as well as rates for annual non-resident licenses, outlined on the DNR's website.

Changes to Expect in Michigan's 2022 Fishing Regulations

With your 2022 Michigan fishing license, you are welcome to use it while following regulations set by the DNR. A license does not grant you "free-for-all" access to Michigan's fish and lakes. However, it makes it legal.

There are some changes to Michigan fishing regulations the DNR has made, though, that go into effect on April 1st, 2022.

Those changes, per the Department of Natural Resources Newsroom include:

  • Walleye size minimum limit has been increased from 13 inches to 15 inches in Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair river to match statewide regulations.
  • Round Whitefish (Menominee) limit raised by 10 additional fish daily from Lake Superior.
  • Underwater spearfishing has been added for Walleye, Northern Pike and Lake Trout in Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, though you do need a NEW underwater spearfishing license which comes complimentary with your $1 sportcard (more info on DNR website)
  • Hook fishing regulations on the Torch and Rapid Rivers making the use of anything but a single-pointed, one-half inch or less hook illegal from May 1st to July 1st
  • Rainbow Trout (Steelhead) possession limits have been put into place on Type 3 and Type 4 inland streams from March 15th to May 15th

Find More Information on Fishing Regulations in 2022 Michigan Fishing Guide

With various regulations changing from year-to-year, the Michigan DNR puts out a guide to keep all the information in one place for everyone from casual fishers to master anglers.

If you need more information or, again, this is your first year with a fishing license, find everything you need to know in the 2022 Michigan Fishing Guide.

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