It's Sunday night at Fenway Park, the Red Sox are taking on the Cubs, and the jumbotron at the game features a couple... We all see what's coming next...

The tried trite and true proposal on the big screen.

Except, it seems no one saw this coming after the proposal...

Yup, this actually happened. In real life. Just this past weekend in Boston.

It turns out the girl said no. But, can we discuss the real issue here?

Proposals at sporting events are just terrible, in my opinion. Proposals should be unique and intimate to the couple in question, so unless both parties have ties to that sport/stadium/team, why on earth one would choose to propose live on a jumbotron at a sporting event in front of thousands of strangers is beyond me.

Another issue--and I feel like this is the larger thing at play here--is that people think the girl should have "just said yes". Literally. There is video of a chant being started:"Just say yes, Just say yes!"

But why is it on the girl to "just say yes"? Why should she "just say yes" to the biggest question of her life? Because YOU decided to propose to someone in front of THOUSANDS of people and put a colossal amount of pressure on them? That person should then be obligated to say yes?

That doesn't exactly sound like the best start to a marriage.

The argument I'm hearing rumblings of is that the girl should have said "yes" for the cameras and then told him "no" later. But wouldn't that have been even worse? To be told yes, but then be told later by the love of your life: "Oh, by the way, I don't really want to marry you."

And now some people are saying this poor girl in Boston embarrassed the guy. Why is it more important for this girl to spare the proposer's feelings than it is to do the right thing? Why would you put someone in this kind of position in the first place, one where they would feel obligated to say yes in order to avoid embarrassment?

Do you really want the person you're proposing to to feel obligated to say yes if they truly don't want to marry you?

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